Measuring Worth?

16 April 2009

measuring-tape-v2

A long time ago, a clever man once said, “A man’s worth is no greater than his ambitions” (the Roman Emperor Philosopher, Marcus Aurelius).

This may have been true in AD150 but is it still relevant in the always-on world of AD2009? These days a more common measure of worth is your connectivity. Reid Hoffman (LinkedIn co-founder) summed this up nicely when he said, “Your network your net worth.” One of Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s Top Life Tips is to, “go to more parties”. The express reason for this is to expand your network and expose yourself to more positive Black Swans.

A couple of weeks back we received an invite to a London networking event. The speakers were sold on the basis of the number of Twitter followers they had. This made me smile as it reminded me of recent conversations about the pressures and politics of maintaining relationships online.

Is the number of followers a true proxy for how valuable someone’s opinion is? I give you Britney Spears (903,274 followers).

My stepson Newton (694 Facebook friends) loves the fact he’s “more popular” than his younger brother Richard (389 Facebook friends). Phil (646 Facebook friends, 433 LinkedIn connections, 244 Twitter followers) and I (232 Facebook friends, 431 LinkedIn connections, 251 Twitter followers) regularly pull each other’s legs about how ‘popular’ we think we are.

To finish off this post, here’s a list of people we’ve either met or hear about regularly who are attached to the Internet scene here in London. We’ve used Twitter followers to help us measure their worth. Not sure old Marcus would agree with our methods but here you go anyway:

London’s 50 Most Networked Internet People by Twitter followers (As of 14th April 2009)


1. Jemima Kiss

10,568 followers

http://twitter.com/jemimakiss


2. Mike Butcher

8.888 followers

http://twitter.com/mikebutcher



3. Nick Donnelly

4,329 followers

http://www.twitter.com/nickdonnelly



4. Paul Walsh

4,094 follower

http://twitter.com/PaulWalsh



5. Paul Carr

3,551 followers

http://twitter.com/paulcarr



6. Amanda Rose

3,436 followers

http://twitter.com/amanda



7. Michelle Dewberry

3,360 followers

http://twitter.com/michelledewbs



8. Hermoine Way

2,431 followers

http://twitter.com/hermoineway



9. Sam Sethi

2,189 followers

http://www.twitter.com/ssethi



10. Nick Halstead

1,847 followers

http://twitter.com/nickhalstead



11. Michael Acton Smith

1,757 followers

http://twitter.com/acton



12. Richard Morross

1,246 followers

http://twitter.com/stewarttownsend



13. Mat Morrison

1,424 followers

http://www.twitter.com/mediaczar



14. Nathan McDonald

1,362 followers

http://twitter.com/nathanmcdonald



15. Joff Arnold

1,253 followers

http://twitter.com/toodlepip



16. Joshua March

1252 followers

http://twitter.com/joshuamarch



17. Stewart Townsend

1,246 followers

http://twitter.com/stewarttownsend



18. Basheera Khan

1,098 followers

http://twitter.com/bash



19. Andy McLoughlin

1,069 followers

http://twitter.com/robertloch



20. Benjamin Ellis

1,007 followers

http://twitter.com/BenjaminEllis



21. Sam Michel

1,004 followers

http://twitter.com/toodlepip



22. Ben Way

936 followers

http://twitter.com/benbpway



23. Sophie Cox

890 followers

http://twitter.com/sophiecox



24. David Terrar

883 followers

http://www.twitter.com/dt



25. Bindi Karia

803 followers

http://twitter.com/bindik



26. Alex Hoye

765 followers

http://www.twitter.com/alexhoye



27. Stephanie Robesky

756 followers

http://twitter.com/nerdgirl



28. Luke Razzell

736 followers

http://twitter.com/weaverluke



29. Bastian Lehmann

683 followers

http://www.twitter.com/basti



30. Elizabeth Varley

660 followers

http://twitter.com/evarley



31. Robert Loch

656 followers

http://twitter.com/robertloch



32. Sokratis Papafloratos

652 followers

http://twitter.com/sokratis



33. Nic Brisbourne

643 followers

http://twitter.com/pmross



34. Mario Cacciottolo

629 followers

http://twitter.com/mariosotm



35. Andrew Scott

626 followers

https://twitter.com/andrewjscott



36. Danvers Baillieu

610 followers

https://twitter.com/danversbaillieu



37. David Langer

602 followers

https://twitter.com/langer



38. James Cherkoff

600 followers

https://twitter.com/cherkoff



39. Nick Bell

593 followers

https://twitter.com/nickbelluk



40. Barry Vitou

557 followers

https://twitter.com/bazv



41. Steve Kennedy

499 followers

https://twitter.com/stevekennedyuk



42. Chris Osborne

422 followers

https://twitter.com/chrsoz



43. Emma Haslett

415 followers

http://www.twitter.com/emmahaslett



44. Fabio De Bernardi

399 followers

https://twitter.com/fabiodebe



45. Meriem Aissaoui

375 followers

http://twitter.com/mernas



46. Robin Klein

375 followers

http://twitter.com/robinklein



47. Dug Falby

349 followers

http://twitter.com/dug



48. Nikhil Shah

344 followers

http://www.twitter.com/nikhilshah



49. Stephanie Bouchet

328 followers

http://twitter.com/rougefrog



50. Paul Mackenzie Ross

325 followers

http://twitter.com/pmross

The master version of  this list appears on the Snagsta website. View it here to share it with your nearest and dearest.

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Tell us what you think… honestly

4 October 2008

For those of you who have visited the private beta in the last few weeks, you may have noticed the new feedback functionality we added in the last update. Since we are also using it for bug reporting, it’s a good thing it has turned out to be one of the least buggy features in the beta.

Sadly Snagsta can’t really take any credit for this, because it is a copy and paste job from Kampyle although we can strongly recommend it for any other new sites out there that need a quick feedback feature.

They do have some hideous design options, but for the most part set up was breeze, and we even managed to inject some of our usual bad “Snagsta” humour into the compliments section.

As always with feedback, what you get back from users can sometimes be a bit of a confusing mix. So far we’ve had a bunch of bug reports, a couple of nice compliments, one submission that simply said “What??” and of course some spam.

What I find interesting though are the different attitudes that come through, with some people obviously just trying to be helpful (even if they do leave some very cryptic messages), others being helpful but also managing to somehow sound so condescending (probably unintentionally) and yet others who are apologetic as if it is their fault that they couldn’t make something work.

So, if you find yourself with some time on your hands, please feel free to leave us some feedback. We would love to hear from you.

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How bad can an exotic boat trip go?

26 August 2008

As Ratty so beautifully put it “There is nothing – absolutely nothing – half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.”

Unless of course you didn’t use Snagsta to find your boat…

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Cheating on Della

27 June 2008

As many (many) people will tell you, I am (occasionally) a bit of a twat, no more so than when I have been sitting alone for too long in front of my computer, and it was after one of these prolonged periods of isolation that I decided to christen my faithful computer Della – an incredibly clever play on the fact that it (she) is a Dell machine.

It does feel sometimes that I am married to her, since we spend so much time together and she controls large aspects of my life. However, last week, I began to cheat on Della in the worst possible way.

I bought a MacBook.

I’m trying not to feel too guilty, but it is hard when I know I look so much better sitting with the MacBook than I ever would with poor old Della.

The fact of the matter is, I had to do it. Absolutely no choice in the matter because far too many of the kind of people we want Snagsta to attract are also using Macs, so we have to test very carefully on their behalf.

Now all I need to do is come up with an equally clever name for my second wife – Macy perhaps…

I leave you with a great list from Jeff Zweig, Web Guru extraordinaire:

Favorite ways to make Mac OS X suck less
Let’s face it. Windows really sucks and Mac OS X sucks, too, but not as much. This is my list of third party software add-ons that help make OS X suck even less!

1. Get Pathfinder
Significantly improves the lousy usability of Finder.

2. Get Google desktop
Much easier to use than Spotlight in its lame, native form plus it’s free.

3. Get Quicksilver
Outstanding and mega-powerful keyboard control, application launching and so much more for those of us who shun the mouse plus it’s free.

4. Get Parallels
Run Windows apps that can’t run in OS X

5. Get SuperDuper!
Best backup software ever!

6. Get WiFind
This tasty little app costs only 8 bucks and lets us know in advance whether available WiFi networks are secure or not and how strong their signals are.

7. Get Firefox
THE browser of the civilized on any platform. Better than Safari for its huge range of free plug-ins and better cross-browser support than Safari.

8. Get Office 2008 for Mac
Anything is better than the Rosetta converted Office 2004 dog that runs on Intel Macs. We can only hope that the promised Office 2008 universal version will run properly on Intel.

9. Get Spot Inside
Essential add-on to the lame, native form of Spotlight and it’s free.

10. Get Laserlight
Another essential add-on to the weak native form of Spotlight and it’s free, too.

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